Someya, Shinichi, Ph.D.

Published: March 15th, 2012

Category: Faculty, IOA Affiliate Members

Profile Picture

Title

Associate Professor,
Department of Aging and Geriatric Research
Biology of Aging Division
Institute on Aging

Address

1600 SW Archer Road
PO Box 100143, Gainesville, FL 32610

E-mail

someya@ufl.edu

Phone

352-294-5167

Fax

352-294-5058

Departmental Affiliation

Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences

Education

1991, BA, Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley
2005, PhD, Applied Biological Chemistry, University of Tokyo

Additional Information

Visit the Someya Lab

Appointments

Primary Appointment:
Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, Division of Biology of Aging

Accomplishments

Honors:
2007 Investigator Award in Biomedical Aging Research, 19th Annual Colloquium on Aging, UW Institute on Aging
2008 Paul Glenn Runner Up Award, The American Aging Association
2010 The 39th Annual Meeting of the American Aging Association Travel Award
2010 The 18th Annual NIA Summer Training Course in Experimental Aging Research Award
2011 The 2011 MidWinter Meeting Postdoctoral Fellow Travel Award
2014 Certificate of Appreciation, UF University Minority Mentorship Program
2014 University of Florida College of Medicine 2014 Exemplary Teacher
2015 2015 William R. Jones Outstanding Mentor Awards, Florida Education Fund
2017 University of Florida College of Medicine University Term Professors for the 2017-2018 Year
2017 University of Florida College of Medicine 2017 Exemplary Teacher

Professional Interests

Research Interests
I study the molecular mechanisms that underlie cochlear aging and gender differences in hearing in the Department of Aging & Geriatric Research, Institute on Aging at the University of Florida. Our work employs molecular genetics tools to identify the genes and pathways involved in aging, detoxification, mitochondrial dysfunction, and estrogen receptor signaling. These studies are complemented by the use of electrophysiology and histology to assess hearing function and cochlear pathology. We use mice as a model system because the mouse inner ear is anatomically similar to that of human and the homologies between the mouse and human genomes are well-established.

Curriculum Vitae

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Presentations

Publications

See CV